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50 Uses of Turpentine in 1930


 

 History of Coffee County, Georgia      Atlanta 1930              pp 314-315 

Source:  Warren P. Ward                   

Information from U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, Office of Forest Products.

    Volatile thinner for paints, varnishes, and wood fillers

     To accelerate oxidation in drying oils (as ozonizer)

     Solvent for waxes in shoe and leather polishes, floor polishes, and  furniture polishes

     Solvent for gums in lacquers and varnishes

     Ingredients of waterproof cement for leather, rubber, glass metals, etc.

     Solvent for waterproofing compositions

     Cleaner for removing paints and oils from fabrics

     Pharmaceutical purposes, including disinfectants, liniments, medicated soaps, internal remedies,

     ointments

     Raw materials for producing synthetic camphor and indirectly, celluloid, exposives, fireworks, and machines

     Raw material for producing terpineol and eucalyptol

     Raw material for producing terpin-hydrate used in medicines

     Raw material for producing isoprene used in making synthetic rubber

     In the manufacture of sealing wax

     In glazing putty

     Ingredients of some printing inks

     In color printing, processes in lithography

     Lubricant in grinding and drilling glass

     As a moth repellant and in moth exterminators

     Constituent of insecticides

     For cleaning firearms (alone or in combination with other materials)

     In laundry glosses

     In washing preparations

     In rubber substitutes

     In wood stains

     In stove polishes

     In molding wax and grafting waxes

     In belting greases

     In drawing crayons

     In the manufacture of leather

     As a substitute for pine oil

     In flotation concentration of ores

     Solvent for rubber, caoutchouc, and similar substances

     Used to prevent "bleeding" in the manufacture of cotton and print goods

    Laboratory reagent, as substitute for more expensive organic solvent

     Oxygen carrier in refining in petroleum illuminating oils

     Colored turpentine, reagent for wood and cork in biological technique